MSDN Magazine Issues Digital from 2001 to 2012 Full Year Collection


 

qq Microsoft provides the editorial content for MSDN Magazine, a monthly publication. The magazine was created as a merger between the Microsoft Systems Journal (MSJ) and Microsoft Internet Developer (MIND) magazines in March 2000. MSJ back issues are available online. MSDN Magazine is available as a print magazine in the United States, and online in 11 languages.
The service started in 1992, but initially only the Microsoft Developer Network CD-ROM was available. A Level II subscription was added in 1993, that included the MAPI, ODBC, TAPI and VFW SDKs. MSDN logo, 2001–2009
MSDN2 was opened in November 2004 as a source for Visual Studio 2005 API information, with noteworthy differences being updated web site code, conforming better to web standards and thus giving a long awaited improved support for alternative web browsers to Internet Explorer in the API browser. In 2008, the original MSDN cluster was retired and MSDN2 became msdn.microsoft.com.
In 1992, Bob Gunderson began writing a column in the MSDN Developer News (an actual paper-based publication) using the pseudonym “Dr.GUI”. The column provided answers to questions submitted by MSDN subscribers. The caricature of Dr. GUI was based on a photo of Gunderson. When he left the MSDN team, Dennis Crain took over the Dr. GUI role and added medical humor to the column. Upon his departure, Dr. GUI became the composite identity of the original group (most notably Paul Johns) of Developer Technology Engineers that provided in-depth technical articles to the Library. The early members included: Bob Gunderson, Dale Rogerson, Ruediger R. Asche, Ken Lassesen, Nigel Thompson (a.k.a. Herman Rodent), Nancy Cluts, Paul Johns, Dennis Crain, and Ken Bergmann. They were the best developers that could also communicate well in writing at Microsoft. Nigel Thompson was the development manager for the Windows Multimedia Extensions that originally put multimedia into Windows. As lead of this small team, he often took them rock climbing. The short climbing routes at exit 38 of I-90 provided inspiration for some and fear for others. All-in-all, it was a good place to from which to put all MSDN tasks in perspective.[citation needed] Ken Lassesen produced the original system (Panda) to publish MSDN on the Internet and in HTML instead of the earlier multimedia viewer engine. Dale Rogerson, Nigel Thompson and Nancy Cluts all published MS Press books while on the MSDN team. As of August 2010, few[who?] around Microsoft remember Dr. GUI and only Dennis Crain and Dale Rogerson remain employed by Microsoft.

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